Did Al Gore Invent The Internet?

Al Gore was Vice President of the United States, serving under President Bill Clinton, from 1993-2001. In the presidential election of 2000, he gained a special place in history, when his bid for the presidency ended in a statistical tie with George Bush – even though Gore won 500,000 more popular votes than Bush. The circumstances of that election were very unusual, and the nation went several confusing days without a president-elect. After numerous attempts at vote recounts in Florida, George W. Bush was finally named President of the United States via a special decree by the Supreme Court, which ruled 5-4 in favor of Bush.

George W. Bush left office after the election of 2008, as the stock market, and the U.S. economy were tumbling to pieces. Al Gore emerged as a Nobel Peace Prize winner for his work on global warming, and his documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth” was given an Academy Award as Best Documentary of 2007.

Nothing Gore does is ever commonplace. He is a progressive thinker who grew up in a notable political family. As the son of Senator Albert Gore, Sr., his career in politics was preordained. Yet in a career filled with accolades, there is one career achievement that is still contested. Did Al Gore invent the Internet, as he seemingly claimed?

Let’s take a look at the facts: During a 1999 interview on CNN with Wolf Blitzer, Gore was asked why voters should vote for him. Gore responded that during his service in the U.S. Congress, he “took the initiative” in creating the Internet, and helped open it up to commercial use. This phrase was quickly misconstrued to sound as if Gore himself had taken full credit for creating the Internet. When asked about it later, Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn, who actually did much of the pioneering work on the Internet, came to Gore’s defense, citing his progressive early work in congress in support of the Internet. Their defense, finally, laid to rest the controversy over Gore and his claims regarding “the information superhighway.”